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20121118
20121118
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
. i think a lot of it has to do with -- i think people were more shocked by the riot in california. the riot in l.a. tell us about that. how does it really change the black movement? or just the way people perceive civil rights? i guess another way of putting it. what does it do to black community, to white liberalism. what happens with watts? >> guest: to white liberalism, what it does is -- a number of white liberals were shoulder-to-shoulder with blacks in the south, some were killed. after watts a lot of them sat back and said, hmm, these guys, they're not christ like nonviolent civil rights people. they're hoodlums. they're burning -- burn, baby, burn, they're bad people, fighting the police, and burning down buildings. and so this sort of makes a lot of white people cautious and not really sure what is happening here. and they don't like what they see. i'm not a saying that they give up on freedom struggle. johnson doesn't give up on in the freedom struggle. he continues to try to get legislation after this. although initially he is staggered by this how much could this happe
for the big items to come up, currently there is an initiative in california launched by the american bar association to promote the international criminal court and to get the u.s. to join the international criminal court and they are paying for members of the court to come here and meet with american judges. they see this as a long-term process. this is a long-term thing even after they die they hope this is a goal that they will someday reach and we should look at that in protecting the american republic and sometimes it is disturbing to people on our side that says, i mean those that would like to see the american republic survive as long as it possibly can. nothing is forever, so this republic is also not going to last forever. i don't know if that is true because we don't know the future and i will stick with john adams it's rare to last forever and i went to try to make it that way. [applause] >> you are watching book tv on c-span2. joining us now in the studio is malcolm, the founder and the chairman of the foundation of the american writers museum. very quickly, what is the ameri
. there's a bunch left over here even. >> reporter: christy porter runs hidden harvest in california. her workers pick through harvested fields to salvage what's left over before the plows catch up with them. >> many times we've evennen dirt behind the plow in order to get the produce harvested. >> reporter: the rescue veggies are given away to local communities like this retirement village where they wait in line for food that otherwise would have gone to waste. >> green beans just picked this morning. >> reporter: and this recovery effort is really small potatoes, so to speak, compared to this one. >> everything else is one point. reporter: at loaves and fishes in namerville, illinois, 75% of everything you see here was destined for the dumpster. now it's free for the needy. >> this is a good alternative to not eating. >> we're in the richest county in illinois. yet one in five kids will go hungry sometime this year. >> reporter: pete shaffer runs the northern illinois food bank. he makes deals with businesses like the illinois supermarket jane to donate less than perfect food instead o
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)